Cool Stats, Tutorials

Practical case – Part I: Analysis of real data from a campaign

Information about votes and fans attracted due to voting

Many of you create promotions and competitions with us, then you check the number of participants but you miss out on a lot of other possibilities! We cannot keep letting that happen and want to show you a practical case with all of the data that you can get through our platform which we’re sure you will be able to make use of in future in social network campaigns. In this post, we will not only tell you what data we can provide you with, but also how to analyse this data.

How to analyse the data that I get through Cool Stats 3.0 Essentials

1. Total likes for the page, fans increased, participations and votes

Total likes for the page, fans increased, participations and votes

These are the first pieces of data that we provide in the statistics and, of course, they are the most important. But what do they mean?

  • Likes: Total number of fans that the page has at the moment.
  • Fans increased: The number of new fans that the page has gained throughout the campaign.
  • Fans increased due to the promotion (smaller number): The users that have had to become fans of the page in order to vote or take part in the promotion.
  • Participations: Total number of entries in the promotion.
  • Participations from new fans (smaller number): Number of entries to have come from fans that previously weren’t fans and had to become fans of the page in order to be able to take part.
  • Votes: Total number of votes in the promotion.
  • Votes from new fans (smaller number): Number of votes to have come from fans that previously weren’t fans and had to become fans of the page in order to be able to vote.

As administrators and creators of the campaign we usually have some targets or aims for the promotion. Have we achieved our aims?

If it is the first time that you are holding a competition, you may not know how much diffusion and interaction there will be. The fact is that conversion depends on many things such as: the prize, the number of fans or followers that you have, the marketing campaign that you run, etc. With this in mind and just to serve as a guide, we can tell that the averages across all campaigns that have been run with Cool Tabs are as follows:

  • Average number of fans increased as a direct result of the promotion: 745
  • Average number of entries: 480
  • Average number of entries from new fans (%): 24% from new fans and 76% from existing fans
  • Average number of votes: 2273
  • Average number of votes from new fans (%): 42.6% from new fans and 57.4% from existing fans

The conclusion we can draw from our averages is that there is a generally higher uptake if the competition includes that possibility of voting.

2. Summary: Progress of number of likes and audience gained throughout the campaign

Fan page: Total likes

This chart allows us to analyse on which days we attracted the largest number of fans. We can use the filter below the chart to filter by date and look at each day or week in more detail. This chart helps us to see on which days there has been a higher uptake and to then analyse why it happened on those days and not on others. There may have been more interest generated because of a post on our Facebook wall, because of a newsletter promoting the campaign, because we’ve just launched an advertisement on Facebook Ads, or for other reasons.

Audience increased - New fans

This chart shows the audience increased during the campaign. In this case we can see that, because it is a page with lot of followers, existing fans were the main audience for our competition and new fans made up 9,2% of the audience. If the page were to have one and a half million fans, for example, we could say that the campaign had been a resounding success since it would have gained over 138,000 fans. However, for some competitions focused on attracting fans or for those launched on fan pages with fewer followers, the audience gained can far surpass the number of existing fans, which means that we need to know our starting point to be able to accurately assess the success of the campaign.

3. Analysis of entries

Through the menu above the statistics, we can access more detailed information about entries, visits and votes. We’ll start with the analysis of the data shown in the participations section.

Fans increased as a direct result of the promotion

Fans increased as a direct result of the promotion

We are looking at a campaign with a high number of entries, but we can also see that with the 11,690 entries that we’ve received, we’ve also gained 9,261 fans. It was a campaign expressly aimed at increasing our number of fans  and it was a resounding success.

What other information is important? The number of participants referred by another participant. That is an entry that could come following an invite or because a user’s participation or the competition itself was published on their Facebook wall and led to a further entry. Similarly, it could be an entry resulting from the first participant sending the personalised URL regarding their participation by email to their friends or posting it on Twitter.

In this case we have 396 referred entries. Is that a lot or little in relation to the total number of entries? In this case, it is good because there was no voting in this campaign, nor were users rewarded for inviting their friends to take part. So it is logical that participants did not share the competition very much and also that there were less referrals than if things had been set up differently.

Conversion of unique users/participations

We are looking at a campaign with a high number of entries, but we can also see that with the 11,690 entries that we've received, we've also gained 9,261 fans. It was a campaign expressly aimed at increasing our number of fans  and it was a resounding success. What other information is important? The number of participants referred by another participant. That is an entry that could come following an invite or because a user's participation or the competition itself was published on their Facebook wall and led to a further entry. Similarly, it could be an entry resulting from the first participant sending the personalised URL regarding their participation by email to their friends or posting it on Twitter. In this case we have 396 referred entries. Is that a lot or little in relation to the total number of entries? In this case, it is good because there was no voting in this campaign, nor were users rewarded for inviting their friends to take part. So it is logical that participants did not share the competition very much and also that there were less referrals than if things had been set up differently. Conversion of unique users/entries

This chart shows the daily and cumulative conversion of unique user visits to the promotion and the number of participations from them. We will see the campaign’s number of unique users in another chart later on in the case study, in the visits section. In this case study, there were 6,039 unique users throughout the promotion and 433 entries, so the average daily conversion rate was, as shown in the chart, 5.237%, with the conversion rate peaking at 59.83% and 48.27% on two days, both of which are clearly shown on the chart. What does this mean? We know that on these days there was a significant difference in the conversion rate compared to other days and so we need to analyse why this happened. What did we do on those two days to enhance the conversion rate? Once we figure out why this happened, we need to repeat what we did in future campaigns to try to raise the average conversion rate.

Participation by hour of the day

Participation by hour of the day

This chart from this campaign shows a low level of participation during the night and that around 14:00 was the time with the most participation. This pattern is repeated across several campaigns.

What conclusion can I draw from this chart? If two o’clock in the afternoon is the time when there is the most participation, we should know that so that we can encourage even more participation from users during this time frame.

Participation by day of the week

Participation by day of the weekIn this campaign, the day with by far the highest conversion rate was Wednesday, a pattern that is also repeated across other campaigns. As with the previous chart, we should take this into account when publishing posts or sending newsletters to promote the campaign, etc. First thing on Tuesdays or Wednesdays could be a good time to promote the campaign and persuade the highest number of users to take part, so we should not ignore this. On the contrary, we should give this information the importance that it deserves as it allows us to know a little bit more about our existing and new followers.

Users with the most referrals

Users with the most referrals

This chart comes from a campaign in which points were awarded to the most active users. It was the type of competition that, at Cool Tabs, we call “Ranking based on scores“. In this case, we can see that the user with more referrals attracted 1,057 participants and the second most active user 792 participants.

What does this information mean? This campaign was set up in such a way that active participation was required to win. Why this type of set-up? It is not straightforward as you are tied in with the participant throughout the duration of the promotion. It is a good idea though if the main aim of the promotion is to attract more fans because new users come to you thanks to the very nature of the campaign and this will be reflected in the breakdown of the entries. In this case, the campaign met its target, which was to get over 6,000 entries from referrals.

Detailed analysis of where participations in the campaign came from

Detailed analysis of where entries in the campaign came from

What information do these four charts show us?

  • Participations from new fans: It shows the percentage of entries from fans that have just become fans of the page against entries from existing fans.
  • Participations from mobile devices: It shows the percentage of entries from mobiles and tablets against the percentage of entries from a computer.
  • Participations from other channels (Multichannel): It shows the channels through which entries in the campaign have come. Usually these channels are the fan page, corporate website, blog, microsite, etc.
  • Referred participations: Entries in the campaign that came about due to the viral actions of other users versus the percentage of direct entries.

What conclusions can we draw from these percentages?

  • This campaign has attracted more fans, since 79.2% of participants are new fans of the page.
  • In addition, 42.1% took part using a mobile device, a percentage that is high enough for us to include a URL that is compatible with mobiles and tablets when promoting the campaign.
  • All entries came via the fan page as this competition was not pushed through any other channels.
  • Most of the entries came from direct traffic. Only 3.3% came through the viral action of another participant.

The important thing is to check these four charts to see if everything is consistent with what we expected: If there was a high uptake of new fans and low participation from the page’s existing fans and this was not our aim, we should ask ourselves why. It is also good to know how our participants access the campaign so that we can figure out whether we should change something or not.

Sources of participations

Sources of participation

In the chart we can see that invitation was the source that brought the most participants to the campaign, followed by users’ wall posts. This makes sense since it was a competition where the users’ aim was to make the most referrals. At Cool Tabs, we call this a ‘Referrals competition‘. In contrast to the actions performed by users to attract participants to the campaign, we can also see how many participants have come as direct traffic due to a newsletter, or via AdWords or Twitter. This allows us to decide, for example, whether it is worthwhile investing in AdWords for this sort of campaign. Maybe Google AdWords would work better for us for a different type of campaign but for a referral competition like this one, we may decide not to invest in future. It is good to know the ROI of each source so that we can make decisions and use our money where we get a more meaningful return.

To be able to collect this information, we have to use different links for each source. We provide you with these links when you create a links-based campaign through our platform.

Detail participations received via each source by day

Detail participations received via each source by day

This shows the detail of where the entries in our campaign have come from. We can use the filter below the chart to look at specific dates and click on each of the sources to take a closer look.

In this chart we can see two peaks in participation that came from users’ Facebook walls and also other peaks shown in blue that represent the entries via user invitation. It could be said that, although there are peaks in the entries received due to invitation, in general it has remained constant throughout the campaign except towards the end, where it started to drop. In contrast, there were two dates on which the number of entries coming from users’ wall posts was markedly higher. So much so that it increased the average conversion of unique users to participants. Let’s take a look at why: It may be because there are a couple of users that have a lot of influence and when they share something on their wall it gets the attention of their friends, or it may be because we enhanced the level of participation of those two days through effective marketing.  Let’s not forget that analysing these details will be important for getting better numbers out of future campaigns. The more we understand how fans and non-fans interact with our competitions, the better we can tailor them and the more efficient our actions will be in promoting them.

A curious detail regarding the way that our users do things is that the source that provided the fourth highest number of entries shows users that first received an invitation and accessed the campaign, but end up participating through a link on a user’s wall (the source that provided the sixth highest number of entries is just the opposite, as users accessed the campaign through a link on a wall and ended up voting having received an invitation). Many users need to be reached in different manners before they become a conversion. This does not mean that you have to harass users into doing something, but it is not a bad thing that they see the campaign through different sources to remind them about it and so that their visit eventually becomes an entry. Therefore, we should bear in mind that it is very effective if users receive an invitation from their friends and also see the campaign on their wall, so that is why we encourage our participants to perform those actions. Let’s give them ideas from our fan page.

4. Analysis of votes

This is the next section of the statistics and where we can analyse where the votes have come from and learn a little more about the voters in our campaigns.

Information about votes and fans attracted due to voting

Information about votes and fans attracted due to voting

In this case, most of the voters are new fans of the page, which means that the fact that we have held a competition with a voting system has increased the number fans that we have attracted. This happens in many competitions; in fact, of all the campaigns launched with Cool Tabsthe average amount of votes from new fans of the page is 42.6%, and so we can conclude that it is a good way to get new followers.

We also have the votes from referrals, i.e. those which have resulted from the viral actions of the competition’s participants. Looking at this chart, we could conclude that most of the votes have come from direct sources, which may mean that users are very committed to the campaign and the number of votes has been enhanced by the brand.

In addition to these pieces of general information, there are other small figures related to the custom campaign that the administrator of the promotion has created with Cool Tabs. Here is how to create a campaign of this type so that you can see in detail the pieces of information that interest you the most. You just need to include the URLs that we will provide you with wherever you promote your competition.

Conversion of unique users/votes

Conversion of unique users/votes

This chart shows the daily and cumulative conversion of unique visitors to the promotion and the participation rate. We will see the campaign’s number of unique users in another chart later on in the case study in the visits section. In this case study, there were 17,454 unique users throughout the promotion and 6,037 votes, so the average daily conversion rate was, as shown in the chart, 36.188%. That percentage was exceeded almost every day around the halfway point of the campaign, whilst the percentage was a little lower at the beginning and end of it. So, what does this mean? If the votes were above the average conversion rate, except at the beginning and end of the campaign and on a Monday, where the percentage was slightly better than the average conversion rate (the peak that can be seen towards the bottom in the middle of the chart), it may be to do with the campaign being promoted fairly consistently throughout the promotion, although it took a few days to get going and eventually fell at the end. It is important to know what actions we have taken and when we have taken them so that we can compare that with the dates of major and minor peaks in voting.

Votes by hour of the day

Votes by hour of the day

Unlike with entries, votes are fairly constant throughout the day, with four o’clock in the afternoon seeing the peak.

What conclusion can I draw from this chart? If around 16:00 is the time at which the largest number of votes are made, we should be aware so that we can encourage even more participation from users during this time frame. We can promote the campaign in different ways; one of them may be encouraging users to vote for the entry that they like the most.

Votes by day of the week

Votes by day of the week

In this campaign the day with by far the highest conversion rate is Wednesday for both entries and votes. It is a pattern that is repeated in other campaigns.

As with the previous chart, we should take this into account when promoting our page to try to get the highest conversion rate for our users both to enter and vote. The best thing to do is to promote participation and voting separately, changing the message for each one. This way you get different user profiles interested in doing one thing or another, and, in some cases, both. We have to try to work out what works best for our unique users.

Users with the most referred votes

Users with the most referred votes

A referral is counted as a vote received via a link, wall post or invitation within 48 hours of the publication of the link or sending of the invitation. This chart shows us the most active users in the sense of those that have managed to attract the greatest number of votes. Generally the ones with the most votes win the competition, but the best thing is for the final verdict to be taken by the administrators of the competition. In this case, the individual with the most referred votes has many more than the rest: 536. The individual with the second most only made it to 228. So, if the total votes were similar, we would have a clear winner, if everything is done as it should be.

Detailed analysis of source of votes in the campaign

Detailed analysis of source of votes in the campaign

What information do these four charts show us?

  • Votes from new fans: It shows the percentage of votes from fans that have just become fans of the page against votes from existing fans.
  • Votes from mobile devices: It shows the percentage of votes from mobiles and tablets against the percentage of votes from a computer.
  • Votes from other channels (Multichannel): It shows the channels through which votes have come in the campaign. Usually, these channels are the fan page, corporate website, blog, microsite, etc.
  • Referred votes: Votes in the campaign that have come about due to the viral actions of other users against the percentage of votes from direct traffic.

What conclusions can we draw from these percentages?

  • This campaign has attracted more fans, since 66.8% of the votes came from new fans of the page.
  • In addition, 24.2% voted using a mobile device. Not a very high percentage in this case, but even so, let’s not forget to always include a URL that is compatible with mobiles and tablets when promoting the campaign.
  • All votes came via the fan page as this competition was not available through any other channels.
  • Most of the votes came from direct traffic. Only 38.5% came due to the viral action of another participant.

The most curious thing from these four charts from the case study is that the act of voting has also helped us to attract new fans, so we will consider using this set up for future campaigns where we want to get new followers.

Sources of votes

Sources of votes

Despite what we saw in the entries section regarding invitations and wall posts being the main sources for attracting participants to the campaign, in this case, the main source of votes is direct traffic, although that is closely followed by users’ wall posts and invitations. However, in this case study, the source of the votes was very much divided across the campaign’s different possibilities and promotion formats.

We should remember that to be able to collect this information, we have to use different links for each source. We provide you with these links when you create a links-based campaign through Cool Tabs.

Detail of votes via each source by day

Detail of votes via each source by day

This chart shows the detail for where the votes in our campaign have come from. We can use the filter below the chart to look at specific dates and click on each of the sources to take a closer look.

The most remarkable thing from the chart for this case study is that there is one day when there was a peak in votes that came from direct traffic. That peak is also reflected in the votes that came via Facebook invitations and, to a lesser extent, those that came from Facebook users’ walls. The question that we have to ask is: What happened that day for us to get that peak in the number of votes? We should be giving answers to these questions so that our promotional activities can be as targeted as possible. The more that we understand everything, the better the results that we will get.

For example, in this case study, it is interesting that the source that generated the fourth highest number of votes is from users that first received an invitation and accessed the campaign, but ended up participating through a link on a user’s wall. The source that provided the fifth highest number of votes it is just the opposite; users that accessed the campaign through a link on a wall and ended up voting having received an invitation. Many users need it to reach them in different manners before they become a conversion, just as we explained for the similar chart regarding the entries.

5. Analysis of visits

This is the next section of the statistics and where we can analyse where the visits have come from and learn a little more about the visitors to our campaigns.

Visits to your campaign

Visits to your campaign

We are looking at a campaign that received a lot of attention as far as we can see from the visits, receiving 8,312 visits in total from 6,039 unique users, with 18,593 being the total number of page views.

In this chart, the thing that stands out the most the number of page views towards the end of the promo, but also that the number of unique users and visits significantly decreases. If we look at the previous charts, we may realise that we did more promotional activity at the start of the promotion, with an AdWords campaign or even a banner in our newsletter, and then in the second part of the campaign we only used posts on our fan page wall. This could this be the reason, but if not, we should be able to find out what the reason is using the detailed charts relating to visits that we are about to look at.

In addition to these pieces of general information, there is another small figure related to the customized campaign that the administrator of the promotion created in Cool Tabs, which shows that 4,557 visits have come via this route. Here we will show you how to create a campaign of this type so that you can see in detail the pieces of information that interest you the most. You just need include the URLs that we will provide you with wherever you promote your competition.

Visits by hour of the day

Visits by hour of the dayThe chart for this campaign shows how the volume of visits falls during the night, but that nevertheless around 01:00 is the time when there are the most visits. This can happen when a campaign is run in several countries and where, as in this case study, one o’clock in the morning is the result of a surge in visits from different places at the same time.

What conclusion can I draw from this chart? If one o’clock in the morning is the time with the most visits, we should know that so that we can try to increase conversion during this time frame and get more entries and votes from users.

Visits by day of the week

Visits by day of the weekIn this campaign, the day with by far the highest number of visits is Wednesday, the same as we’ve seen for entries and votes. As with the previous chart, we should take this into account when publishing posts or sending newsletters to promote the campaign, etc. First thing on Tuesdays or Wednesdays could be a good time to promote the campaign and persuade the highest number of users to take part.

Referred visits by users

Referred visits by users

A referred visit is counted as a visit to the campaign via a link, wall post or invitation received from a participant in the promotion. In this case, the number of referred visits per participant is less than the number of referred entries or votes. The participant that referred the most visits managed to refer 394 visitors to the campaign. Let’s look at the following charts to see whether or not there have been many referred visits and what their sources were.

Detailed analysis of source of visits to the campaign

Detailed analysis of source of visits to the campaign

What information do these two charts show us?

  • Direct visits vs. referred visits: It shows the percentage of visits directly to the campaign against those who came via a user’s Facebook wall, the fan page, a Twitter link, etc. We can see that the number of referred visits was significantly higher than direct visits, which means that most of the visits were due to the promotional activities of the administrator or of the participants themselves.
  • Visits from mobile devices: It shows the percentage of visits from mobiles and tablets against the percentage of visits from a computer. In this case, users accessed the campaign more from a computer, but we still need to think about users who visit from a mobile device, so let’s not forget to always include a URL that is compatible with mobiles and tablets when promoting the campaign.

Sources of visits

Sources of visits

Looking back at the charts regarding the sources that brought us the most participants and voters for this campaign, invitation was the leading source for entries and direct traffic the leading source for votes, with the Facebook wall of other users being one of the other most main sources for the campaign. However, we found that 43.9% of visitors reach the campaign through the administrator’s Facebook wall posts, a much larger percentage than the main sources for participation and voting.

What conclusion can we draw from this analysis? If the majority of visits to the campaign come via the administrator’s wall but it is not the main source for participants or voters, it means that the wall posts on the fan page help to publicise the campaign but it is not the route that has the highest conversion rate for us. Invitations or users’ wall posts encourage more users to either participate or vote because it promotes the campaign in a more personal way. At the end of the day, it is not the same if a Facebook friend encourages you to participate or vote for them in a competition, than if a company or organisation asks you to do the same. This means that, for our campaigns, we need active fans that have either some sort of leadership ability or are able to awaken the curiosity of other users.

Daily visits by source

Daily visits by source

This chart shows the detail of the sources of visits and is completely different from what we saw for the entries and votes. We can use the filter below the chart to look at specific dates and click on each of the sources to take a closer look.

What can we see in this chart?

  • At the start of the campaign there are two clear peaks due to direct traffic.
  • The number of daily visits from the administrator’s wall posts remains constant from the beginning to the end of the campaign. In fact, it is the only source that keeps a steady stream of daily visits coming, followed, a long way behind, by visitors coming directly to the campaign.
  • Facebook invitations (yellow line) seem to only attract visitors at the beginning of the campaign and then we can see that their effectiveness diminishes. The same happens with users’ wall posts (green line) and with AdWords advertisements (aubergine-coloured line).
  • The publication of the newsletter resulted in a peak of visits to the beginning of the campaign (light blue line), probably because it was at the launch, getting us 175 visits.
  • The number of daily visits from the other sources is less noticeable on the graph unless we filter by date.

The conclusion we can draw regarding visitors to our campaign is that we should be constant in our promotion via the wall of the fan page to at least get users to visit our competition page. The more visits we have, the more chance there is of interaction by participation or voting.

Has this helped you to understand how to analyse a social media campaign with our Cool Stats 3.0 Essentials? If you have any questions, contact us and we will be happy to help.

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